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October To Do List

General

  • Shorter days and cooler nights in October will be the signal for orchids to slow down and prepare for winter’s rest.  Watch them carefully and cut back on water and fertilizer as cooler days and nights prevail. Protect outdoor orchids from the first fall and winter rains.
  • Fall blooming cattlyeas and cymbidiums are beginning their blooming season. Provide adequate water and fertilizer but do so in the mornings so plants dry out before nightfall.
  • Maintain good hygiene practices to minimize transmission of pests and viruses. Watch for fungus and bacterial rot as weather cools and wetter conditions prevail.
  • More details on specific genera can be found on the AOS website

September To Do List

General
  • In spite of the day length becoming shorter in September, this month can still produce very warm days for continued growth of your plants.  Watch them carefully and provide adequate water and fertilizer before tapering off when warm days begin to wane.
  • Some cattlyeas and other genera (dendrobiums, oncidiums) are still in active growth mode so take the opportunity to repot those you may have missed before month’s end to allow enough growth before the onset of cooler weather and initiation of the dormancy period.
  • Maintain good hygiene practices to minimize transmission of pests and viruses, particularly during the warm summer months when pests and diseases can proliferate very quickly and spread throughout the collection. Carefully inspect plants for scale and aphids and treat early to minimize spread.
  • More details on specific genera can be found on the AOS website

September 2013 - Rafael Acosta-Jaramillo

We are delighted to welcome Rafael Acosta-Jaramillo, VP of Sales and Marketing at OrchidSource Laboratory and Nursery located in Vista, CA. Rafael will speak on “Care and Maintenance of Phalaenopsis Orchids”. Phalaenopsis orchids are one of the most popular orchid types maintained by novices and hobbyists alike.

Rafael was first introduced to the fascinating orchid world in 1995 by Barry Lee Cohen, owner of G&B Orchids Lab & Nursery Inc. This introduction to astonishing color, diversity, and uniqueness were the pillars to his true passion for orchid cultivation. Rafael’s OrchidSource Laboratory and Nursery forms an important alliance for orchid conservation together with other reputable orchid growers including Katai Phrao Orchids, Thai OrchidSource, and The Orchid Zone Ltd.

Rafael has been collecting and hybridizing orchids for more than a decade. His vast amount of hands-on experience with orchid cultivation using various laboratory propagation, division, and tissue culture techniques provide for a strong background in general orchid care. Rafael holds a BA in Computer Science as well as a minor in Spanish from the California State University San Marcos.

OrchidSource Nursery will provide the plant table, which will consist of a variety of orchids raised at their nursery.

Date: 
Wed, 09/04/2013 - 6:30pm - 9:30pm

August To Do List

General

  • To avoid excessively high summer light levels and temperatures for your plants provide sufficient shade, increase air movement, and increase frequency of watering/misting to cool plants and prevent them from drying out.  This is particularly important for individuals who live and grow in inland areas, although temperatures on the coast also should be high during this period.
  • Although cattleyas, dendrobiums, encyclias and vandas thrive in high light levels, phalaenopisis, paphiopedilums, miltonopsis, masdevalias and other lower light plants can easily burn. These genera also are easily stressed by high temperatures so try to move them to cooler areas of your growing structures or bring them inside.  Make sure they receive adequate water, paying particular attention to mounted plants.
  • With the exception of some warmer growing cattleyas and dendrobiums, most of your orchids should be repotted by now. Watch for the emergence of new roots from pseudobulbs before repotting the warm growers. Repot when roots are small and just beginning to show in order to minimize damage to soft tissues and avoid transplant shock, giving plants a head start into the growing season.
  • Continue to set aside extra divisions or duplicate plants as donations for the POS auction or for silent auction at the meetings. It will prevent overcrowding of your benches and make someone else happy to get a piece of your prized plant.
  • Maintain good hygiene practices to minimize transmission of pests and viruses, particularly during the warm summer months when pests and diseases can proliferate very quickly and spread throughout the collection. Carefully inspect plants for scale and aphids and treat early to minimize spread.
  • More details on specific genera can be found on the AOS website

July 2013 - Fred Clarke

Spotted and Splashed CattleyasFred ClarkeFred Clarke

We are delighted to host again one of our favorite speakers and long time supporter of the Palomar Orchid Society, Fred Clarke of Sunset Valley Orchids.  Fred will be presenting one of his newest talks on “Spotted and Splashed Cattleyas”.  As many of you know, Fred is excellent orchid hybridizer and has pioneered the development of new lines of compact and mini cattleyas.

Fred’s presentation will highlight his hybridization efforts with this versatile class of orchids.  Fred is a highly sought after lecturer on many orchid subjects and travels extensively around the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Latin and South America.  We are fortunate that he agreed to kick off our first talk in the Lake San Marcos facility, which should prove to be one of the highlights of our 2013 speaker’s program.

Fred has been growing orchids for 34 years and has been hybridizing for 26 of those years. With over 26 years as a professional grower and manager in the horticultural industry, Fred applies these skills at his orchid nursery, Sunset Valley Orchids, located in Vista, California, just north of San Diego. His nursery’s website has considerable information, plants for sale and many beautiful pics of his award winning orchids.   Read more »

Date: 
Wed, 07/03/2013 - 6:30pm - 9:30pm

July To Do List

General

  • Avoid excessively high summer light levels and temperatures this month by providing sufficient shade, increased air movement, and watering/misting to cool plants and prevent them from drying out.  This is particularly important for individuals who live and grow in inland areas.  
  • Although cattleyas, dendrobiums and cymbidiums thrive in high light levels, phalaenopisis, paphiopedilums, miltonopsis, masdevalias and other lower light plants can easily burn.  They also are readily stressed by high temperatures so try to move them in cooler areas of your growing structures.  For most orchids, one wants to have light grassy green leaves.  Dark green leaves suggest too little light, while yellow colored or red tinted leaves usually indicate too much light.
  • July continues the growth and repotting for some orchids (cattleyas, oncidiums, dendrobiums) as new roots continue to emerge from pseudobulbs or fans. Try to repot when roots are small and just beginning to show in order to minimize damage to soft tissues and avoid transplant shock, giving plants a head start in the growing season.
  • Repot when orchids have begun to over grow their pots and/or when media has started to break down.  Also consider repotting plants that have been in pots for 2 or more years and are existing, but not thriving. Repotting can revitalize and provide new vigor to such plants.
  • As you repot and divide many of your plants, set aside the extra divisions as donations for the POS auction or for silent auction at the meetings. It will prevent overcrowding of your benches and make someone else happy to get a piece of your prized plant.
  • Continue to follow good hygiene practices to minimize transmission of pests and viruses, particularly during the warm summer months when pests and diseases can proliferate very quickly and spread throughout the collection. Carefully inspect plants for scale and aphids and treat early to minimize spread.
  • More details on specific genera can be found on the AOS website

June 2013 - Ron Parsons

Miniature Species You Can Enjoy and Grow

Ron ParsonsRon ParsonsWe are excited to welcome Ron Parsons who will speak to us on “Miniature Species You Can Enjoy and Grow”. Ron’s talk is based on a book he is writing, which will be published later this year.  His presentation will feature beautiful color slides of the subject matter, in-depth information, and first-hand knowledge about the species discussed. June’s plant opportunity table will be provided by Andy’s Orchids.

Like many of us, Ron is a true plant lover and has been growing orchids, cacti, and bromeliads for over thirty years, and carnivorous plants for ten. He grows an assortment of cool growing species under lights at his home in South San Francisco and a few more in an unheated greenhouse at his parents home in Burlingame. His collection is beautifully grown, and often the plants featured in his talks are from his own collection. He willingly shares his knowledge about plant habitats and suggestions for culture with all who are interested.   Read more »

June To Do List

General

  • Continued increases in day length and drastic changes in light levels this month may require repositioning of plants to avoid overexposure to sun. Although cattleyas, dendrobiums and cymbidiums thrive in high light levels, phalaenopisis, miltonopsis, masdevallias and other lower light plants can easily burn. For most orchids, optimal light levels are indicated by light grassy green leaves. Dark green leaves suggest too little light, while yellow colored or red tinted leaves usually indicate too much light.
  • Increasing winds may result in additional dust build up on your orchid leaves. This provides the perfect environment for harboring mites. Treat accordingly. During warm weather, pests and diseases can proliferate very quickly and spread throughout the collection. Carefully inspect plants for scale and aphids and treat early to minimize spread. As always, follow good hygiene practices to minimize transmission of pests and viruses.
  • June continues the growth and repotting season for many orchids (cattleyas, oncidiums, dendrobiums) as new roots emerge from pseudobulbs or fans. Try to repot when roots are small and just beginning to emerge in order to minimize damage to soft tissues and avoid transplant shock, giving plants a head start in the growing season. Also repot when orchids have begun to over grow their pots and/or when media has started to break down.  Consider repotting plants that have been in pots for 2 or more years and are existing, but not thriving. Repotting can revitalize and provide new vigor to such plants.
  • As you repot and divide many of your plants, set aside the extra divisions  as donations for the POS auction or for silent auction at the meetings. It will prevent overcrowding of your benches and make someone else happy to get a piece of your prized plant.

2013 POS Orchid Auction Details

Our annual auction will be held on August 3, 2013 at the Pavilion at Lake San Marcos. Preview starts at 11:00 am and the auction begins at noon. This annual orchid event celebrates Palomar Orchid Society with hundreds of flowering orchids (many rare) and other items to be auctioned off. Learn about orchids and their cultivation with numerous orchid experts on hand for questions. Free to the public.   Read more »

Date: 
Sat, 08/03/2013 - 11:00am - 4:00pm

The Conference Center at Lake San Marcos

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Directions: The Conference Center at Lake San Marcos Resort is located at 1105 La Bonita Dr, San Marcos, CA 92078. The entrance to the Lake San Marcos Resort is from Rancho Santa Fe Road where there is a large sign. See the interactive map to the right for details.

To reach the resort's entrance on Rancho Santa Fe Road:   Read more »