Helge W.'s posts

December To Do List

General

  • Short days and cold nights in December will slow down the metabolism of most of your orchids and initiate spikes on Fall/Winter blooming orchids.  Watch them very carefully and cut back on water and fertilizer as cooler days and nights prevail.
  • As watering needs of most plants decrease during the winter, be sure to leach your plants thoroughly. Extend your last watering to remove any accumulated salt built-up in the substrate and root system. Excess mineral built-up prevent plants from absorbing the fertilizer and nutrients they need and may lead to deficiencies during dryer conditions. The St. Augustine Orchid Society hosts a very good collection of articles on water quality.
  • Protect outdoor orchids from winter rains.  Keeping them on the dryer side will allow them to tolerate the cold winter nights we can experience in Southern California.
  • Bring in cold-sensitive, warm growing orchids (phals, paphs, tolumnias, most vandas and some warm growing cattleyas such as violacea, dowiana and their hybrids) to protect them from night temperatures below 50o. An excellent article on ‘Cold Tolerance of Orchids’ by Sue Bottom of the St. Augustine Orchid Society can be found in their October Newsletter (pgs. 9-11)
  • Cold tolerant orchids, including Odontoglossums, Miltonias, Pleurothallids, Masdevallias, and Draculas, will welcome the cooler weather and respond by initiating growth so continue to water and fertilize them during this period but also protect from freezing temps.
  • Fall/winter blooming Cattleyas and Cymbidiums are now in bud or bloom. Provide adequate water and fertilizer, but do so in the mornings so plants dry out before nightfall. Stake cymbidium spikes to guide inflorescences for support of buds and blooms.
  • Maintain good hygiene practices to minimize transmission of pests and viruses. Watch for fungus and bacterial rot in cold and wet weather.
  • More details on specific genera can be found on the AOS website

November To Do List

General

  • Shorter days and cooler nights in November will slow down the metabolism of your orchids and initiate spikes on Fall/Winter blooming orchids.  Watch them carefully and cut back on water and fertilizer as cooler days and nights prevail. Protect outdoor orchids from winter rains.
  • Bring in cold-sensitive, warm growing orchids to protect them from night temperatures below 50°. 
  • Fall/winter blooming cattleyas and cymbidiums are either in bloom or preparing for blooming. Provide adequate water and fertilizer but do so in the mornings so plants dry out before nightfall. Stake cymbidium spikes to guide inflorescences for support of buds and blooms.
  • Maintain good hygiene practices to minimize transmission of pests and viruses. Watch for fungus and bacterial rot as weather cools and wetter conditions prevail.
  • More details on specific genera can be found on the AOS website

November 2013 - Betty Kelepecz

Betty P. KelepeczBetty P. KelepeczGrowing Masdevallias

It is a pleasure to welcome back Betty Kelepezc to our society. Betty has been an orchid hobbyist in Southern California for over 30 years. She has grown orchids in Long Beach and Huntington Beach, and, since 2003, in the Point Loma area of San Diego. She started raising orchids in the early 1980’s when her husband and co-orchid grower Steve brought home a discarded cutting/keiki of a red Epidendrum he found in a trash bin in the alley beside their home in Long Beach. He planted the unimpressive and bloomless cutting on a moss-covered rock and confidently predicted that it would bloom beautifully in no time. When the Epidendrum actually did bloom and, in fact, never since has stopped blooming, the disbelieving Betty became an orchid enthusiast and both of their collection of orchids has since grown with the unwavering passion so often accompanying that first orchid discovery.    Read more »

Date: 
Wed, 11/06/2013 - 6:30pm - 9:30pm

October 2013 - Panel of Orchid Experts

The October meeting will feature our second culture session of the year that will concentrate on “Preparing your Orchids for Winter”.  Panel members will include Nico Goosens (Lico Orchids), Karl Batchman (Casa de las Orquideas), Harry Philips (Andy’s Orchids), and other expert growers.

Believe it or not, winter is approaching!  Although it does not seem so with all the warm weather we are having thus far.  But to your orchids, the waning sun, shorter days and cooler evenings are telling them that it is time to start slowing down to begin their winter’s rest.  To others it is telling them that the mating (flowering) season is fast around the corner.

Cymbidiums also will be send up their spikes of wonderful colors with rainbow hues.  Some dendrobiums will shrink if watered in winter, while others will welcome the chill to set next year's flowers.  The Black Orchid and related members (cycnoches and catasetums) will drop their leaves and go into dormancy.  Cold sensitive plants such as phalaenopsis, tolumnias, and most vandas will need to be brought in to avoid their demise.  Potted orchids will need care different than orchids on sticks.  Do you know how to care for your loved ones?

Join us on 2 October when your fellow orchid growers guide you into the chilly weather to come. Please bring your questions on winterizing your plants as well as any other orchid related questions you may have.

 

The opportunity table will be provided by the three commercial growers and should have a very nice collection of plants.

Date: 
Wed, 10/02/2013 - 6:30pm - 9:30pm

October To Do List

General

  • Shorter days and cooler nights in October will be the signal for orchids to slow down and prepare for winter’s rest.  Watch them carefully and cut back on water and fertilizer as cooler days and nights prevail. Protect outdoor orchids from the first fall and winter rains.
  • Fall blooming cattlyeas and cymbidiums are beginning their blooming season. Provide adequate water and fertilizer but do so in the mornings so plants dry out before nightfall.
  • Maintain good hygiene practices to minimize transmission of pests and viruses. Watch for fungus and bacterial rot as weather cools and wetter conditions prevail.
  • More details on specific genera can be found on the AOS website

September To Do List

General
  • In spite of the day length becoming shorter in September, this month can still produce very warm days for continued growth of your plants.  Watch them carefully and provide adequate water and fertilizer before tapering off when warm days begin to wane.
  • Some cattlyeas and other genera (dendrobiums, oncidiums) are still in active growth mode so take the opportunity to repot those you may have missed before month’s end to allow enough growth before the onset of cooler weather and initiation of the dormancy period.
  • Maintain good hygiene practices to minimize transmission of pests and viruses, particularly during the warm summer months when pests and diseases can proliferate very quickly and spread throughout the collection. Carefully inspect plants for scale and aphids and treat early to minimize spread.
  • More details on specific genera can be found on the AOS website

September 2013 - Rafael Acosta-Jaramillo

We are delighted to welcome Rafael Acosta-Jaramillo, VP of Sales and Marketing at OrchidSource Laboratory and Nursery located in Vista, CA. Rafael will speak on “Care and Maintenance of Phalaenopsis Orchids”. Phalaenopsis orchids are one of the most popular orchid types maintained by novices and hobbyists alike.

Rafael was first introduced to the fascinating orchid world in 1995 by Barry Lee Cohen, owner of G&B Orchids Lab & Nursery Inc. This introduction to astonishing color, diversity, and uniqueness were the pillars to his true passion for orchid cultivation. Rafael’s OrchidSource Laboratory and Nursery forms an important alliance for orchid conservation together with other reputable orchid growers including Katai Phrao Orchids, Thai OrchidSource, and The Orchid Zone Ltd.

Rafael has been collecting and hybridizing orchids for more than a decade. His vast amount of hands-on experience with orchid cultivation using various laboratory propagation, division, and tissue culture techniques provide for a strong background in general orchid care. Rafael holds a BA in Computer Science as well as a minor in Spanish from the California State University San Marcos.

OrchidSource Nursery will provide the plant table, which will consist of a variety of orchids raised at their nursery.

Date: 
Wed, 09/04/2013 - 6:30pm - 9:30pm

August To Do List

General

  • To avoid excessively high summer light levels and temperatures for your plants provide sufficient shade, increase air movement, and increase frequency of watering/misting to cool plants and prevent them from drying out.  This is particularly important for individuals who live and grow in inland areas, although temperatures on the coast also should be high during this period.
  • Although cattleyas, dendrobiums, encyclias and vandas thrive in high light levels, phalaenopisis, paphiopedilums, miltonopsis, masdevalias and other lower light plants can easily burn. These genera also are easily stressed by high temperatures so try to move them to cooler areas of your growing structures or bring them inside.  Make sure they receive adequate water, paying particular attention to mounted plants.
  • With the exception of some warmer growing cattleyas and dendrobiums, most of your orchids should be repotted by now. Watch for the emergence of new roots from pseudobulbs before repotting the warm growers. Repot when roots are small and just beginning to show in order to minimize damage to soft tissues and avoid transplant shock, giving plants a head start into the growing season.
  • Continue to set aside extra divisions or duplicate plants as donations for the POS auction or for silent auction at the meetings. It will prevent overcrowding of your benches and make someone else happy to get a piece of your prized plant.
  • Maintain good hygiene practices to minimize transmission of pests and viruses, particularly during the warm summer months when pests and diseases can proliferate very quickly and spread throughout the collection. Carefully inspect plants for scale and aphids and treat early to minimize spread.
  • More details on specific genera can be found on the AOS website

July 2013 - Fred Clarke

Spotted and Splashed CattleyasFred ClarkeFred Clarke

We are delighted to host again one of our favorite speakers and long time supporter of the Palomar Orchid Society, Fred Clarke of Sunset Valley Orchids.  Fred will be presenting one of his newest talks on “Spotted and Splashed Cattleyas”.  As many of you know, Fred is excellent orchid hybridizer and has pioneered the development of new lines of compact and mini cattleyas.

Fred’s presentation will highlight his hybridization efforts with this versatile class of orchids.  Fred is a highly sought after lecturer on many orchid subjects and travels extensively around the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Latin and South America.  We are fortunate that he agreed to kick off our first talk in the Lake San Marcos facility, which should prove to be one of the highlights of our 2013 speaker’s program.

Fred has been growing orchids for 34 years and has been hybridizing for 26 of those years. With over 26 years as a professional grower and manager in the horticultural industry, Fred applies these skills at his orchid nursery, Sunset Valley Orchids, located in Vista, California, just north of San Diego. His nursery’s website has considerable information, plants for sale and many beautiful pics of his award winning orchids.   Read more »

Date: 
Wed, 07/03/2013 - 6:30pm - 9:30pm

July To Do List

General

  • Avoid excessively high summer light levels and temperatures this month by providing sufficient shade, increased air movement, and watering/misting to cool plants and prevent them from drying out.  This is particularly important for individuals who live and grow in inland areas.  
  • Although cattleyas, dendrobiums and cymbidiums thrive in high light levels, phalaenopisis, paphiopedilums, miltonopsis, masdevalias and other lower light plants can easily burn.  They also are readily stressed by high temperatures so try to move them in cooler areas of your growing structures.  For most orchids, one wants to have light grassy green leaves.  Dark green leaves suggest too little light, while yellow colored or red tinted leaves usually indicate too much light.
  • July continues the growth and repotting for some orchids (cattleyas, oncidiums, dendrobiums) as new roots continue to emerge from pseudobulbs or fans. Try to repot when roots are small and just beginning to show in order to minimize damage to soft tissues and avoid transplant shock, giving plants a head start in the growing season.
  • Repot when orchids have begun to over grow their pots and/or when media has started to break down.  Also consider repotting plants that have been in pots for 2 or more years and are existing, but not thriving. Repotting can revitalize and provide new vigor to such plants.
  • As you repot and divide many of your plants, set aside the extra divisions as donations for the POS auction or for silent auction at the meetings. It will prevent overcrowding of your benches and make someone else happy to get a piece of your prized plant.
  • Continue to follow good hygiene practices to minimize transmission of pests and viruses, particularly during the warm summer months when pests and diseases can proliferate very quickly and spread throughout the collection. Carefully inspect plants for scale and aphids and treat early to minimize spread.
  • More details on specific genera can be found on the AOS website